University of Michigan School of Nursing professors are visiting Salokaya School of Nursing in India. During their visit, they conducted a 3-part workshop, “Sharing Knowledge on HIV-AIDS,” to educate the nursing students on facts and misconceptions about HIV.
Zoom Info
University of Michigan School of Nursing professors are visiting Salokaya School of Nursing in India. During their visit, they conducted a 3-part workshop, “Sharing Knowledge on HIV-AIDS,” to educate the nursing students on facts and misconceptions about HIV.
Zoom Info

University of Michigan School of Nursing professors are visiting Salokaya School of Nursing in India. During their visit, they conducted a 3-part workshop, “Sharing Knowledge on HIV-AIDS,” to educate the nursing students on facts and misconceptions about HIV.

University of Michigan School of Music, Dance and Theater professor Stephen Rush has been taking students to Mysore India every summer to expose them to music, yoga and Indian culture.
Read the blog for their experiences this year here.
Zoom Info
University of Michigan School of Music, Dance and Theater professor Stephen Rush has been taking students to Mysore India every summer to expose them to music, yoga and Indian culture.
Read the blog for their experiences this year here.
Zoom Info
University of Michigan School of Music, Dance and Theater professor Stephen Rush has been taking students to Mysore India every summer to expose them to music, yoga and Indian culture.
Read the blog for their experiences this year here.
Zoom Info

University of Michigan School of Music, Dance and Theater professor Stephen Rush has been taking students to Mysore India every summer to expose them to music, yoga and Indian culture.

Read the blog for their experiences this year here.

Several University of Michigan students spent time in India this summer with fellowships from Center from South Asia.

Emily Presuss spent time with Jeevika an NGO in Kolkata. Others were in New Delhi, Ahmedabad, Dharmasala and Kalol.

Read about their experiences on their blog: 2014sisa.blogspot.com

Video-conferencing with India: Finding a common bond

The students were nervous before the video-conference course began. They didn’t know what to expect from the weekly sessions that would bring together School of Nursing students at the University of Michigan with their counterparts at the Salokaya School of Nursing in Delhi, India.

But U-M student Jessica Page said a common bond quickly developed as they studied community nursing. “Being the best nurse you can be and just having someone’s life in your hands – that’s a universal thing,” she said. “It doesn’t matter if you’re in India or if you’re in Michigan.”

A group of students are spending a month in Golden Temple in Amritsar, India learning about sustainable nourishment.

They are sharing their experiences on a blog - GIEU India 2014

A group of University of Michigan students has spent a month in rural India surveying water needs, a project that gave them a deeper understanding of village life – the delights of the mango harvest, festive weddings and cricket matches.

The students, who called themselves the BLUElab India team, departed in early May to begin the water assessment project that will help them design filtration and storage technology in the western state of Gujarat.

“It involves going to different villages and mapping their water needs. Where does the water come from? What are its uses everyday and how is it disposed?” said Mike McGahren Clemens, team co-leader and a junior in chemical engineering.

Read the complete story here.

Story on NPR about lack of toilets and the risk of assault for women.
nprglobalhealth:

How A Lack Of Toilets Puts India’s Women At Risk Of Assault
A young girl sweeps fallen debris from a tempest that blew through her village of Katra Sahadatganj one recent evening. This remote spot in Uttar Pradesh — India’s largest state — has become the center of another gathering storm.
It was here two weeks ago where two young girls were audaciously attacked: raped and hanged from a tree. Inter-caste violence and patriarchal attitudes combined to make a chilling spectacle in this impoverished place of mud-caked children and hand-pumped water.
But the deaths conceivably could have been averted if the girls had had access to a toilet at home. Lacking one, on the night they were killed, the two teens did what hundreds of millions of women do across India each day: Under the cloak of darkness before sunrise or after sunset, they set out for an open field to relieve themselves.
Guddo Devi, 35, is a cousin of the two slain girls and says women normally move in pairs to avoid being preyed upon.
"When we step out of the house we are scared," Devi says. "And we have to go in the mornings, in the evenings, and when we cannot stop ourselves, at times we go in the afternoons as well. … And there are no bathrooms. We don’t have any kind of facility. We have to go out."
Others complained of harassment in the fields, but only now, after the double rape and murder, do they fear for their lives performing the simplest bodily function.
A Toilet For Change
Social entrepreneur Bindeshwar Pathak has offered to build a toilet for every house in the village. It wouldn’t be the first time for the man known in India as the “toilet guru.”
Nine hours’ drive away in the bordering state of Haryana, Pathak has already transformed the village of Hir Mathala with his simple two-pit design.
Swinging open the door to a toilet bowl built on a raised platform that stands 25 feet from the front door of the owner, Pathak says it requires only one liter to flush, compared with the usual nine liters of water.
With Pathak’s low-maintenance, low-cost toilet — about $250 — one pit gets filled while the other biodegrades the waste, which can be used as fertilizer. Each of the 144 households has been outfitted in this village, a village Pathak calls a “pathfinder … to show the entire nation that you should have toilets in your house. And here nobody goes outside. This is the beauty of this village,” he says.
Continue reading.
Photo: Women shout slogans during a protest against the gang rape and hanging of two teenage girls. Beyond highlighting the rampant sexual violence in India, the crimes are drawing attention to a glaring and fundamental problem across the country that threatens women’s safety: the lack of toilets. (AFP/Getty Images)

Story on NPR about lack of toilets and the risk of assault for women.

nprglobalhealth:

How A Lack Of Toilets Puts India’s Women At Risk Of Assault

A young girl sweeps fallen debris from a tempest that blew through her village of Katra Sahadatganj one recent evening. This remote spot in Uttar Pradesh — India’s largest state — has become the center of another gathering storm.

It was here two weeks ago where two young girls were audaciously attacked: raped and hanged from a tree. Inter-caste violence and patriarchal attitudes combined to make a chilling spectacle in this impoverished place of mud-caked children and hand-pumped water.

But the deaths conceivably could have been averted if the girls had had access to a toilet at home. Lacking one, on the night they were killed, the two teens did what hundreds of millions of women do across India each day: Under the cloak of darkness before sunrise or after sunset, they set out for an open field to relieve themselves.

Guddo Devi, 35, is a cousin of the two slain girls and says women normally move in pairs to avoid being preyed upon.

"When we step out of the house we are scared," Devi says. "And we have to go in the mornings, in the evenings, and when we cannot stop ourselves, at times we go in the afternoons as well. … And there are no bathrooms. We don’t have any kind of facility. We have to go out."

Others complained of harassment in the fields, but only now, after the double rape and murder, do they fear for their lives performing the simplest bodily function.

A Toilet For Change

Social entrepreneur Bindeshwar Pathak has offered to build a toilet for every house in the village. It wouldn’t be the first time for the man known in India as the “toilet guru.”

Nine hours’ drive away in the bordering state of Haryana, Pathak has already transformed the village of Hir Mathala with his simple two-pit design.

Swinging open the door to a toilet bowl built on a raised platform that stands 25 feet from the front door of the owner, Pathak says it requires only one liter to flush, compared with the usual nine liters of water.

With Pathak’s low-maintenance, low-cost toilet — about $250 — one pit gets filled while the other biodegrades the waste, which can be used as fertilizer. Each of the 144 households has been outfitted in this village, a village Pathak calls a “pathfinder … to show the entire nation that you should have toilets in your house. And here nobody goes outside. This is the beauty of this village,” he says.

Continue reading.

Photo: Women shout slogans during a protest against the gang rape and hanging of two teenage girls. Beyond highlighting the rampant sexual violence in India, the crimes are drawing attention to a glaring and fundamental problem across the country that threatens women’s safety: the lack of toilets. (AFP/Getty Images)

(via pubhealth)

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